University of Kentucky College of Agriculture

With the intense weather hitting Kentucky this summer, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture experts are recommending horse owners take stock of their pastures and consider other management options such as supplementing with hay. [more]
Hot, dry weather could have some insects feeding in greater-than-normal numbers on crops like alfalfa, tobacco and some vegetables. [more]
With much of the state’s corn crop either beginning to or preparing to enter pollination, the weather continues to be hot and dry. [more]
In the past few weeks, plant pathologists at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture have seen numerous cases of black shank. Hot, dry conditions this summer likely are to blame.[more]
The extreme drought in Western Kentucky has drastically decreased corn yield potential. As a result, many farmers are making decisions about what to do with the crop. [more]
Grapevines are deeply rooted and have a great knack for finding water in periods of drought; however, the 2012 drought has proved challenging for even the most tenacious vines. [more]
With much of the state’s corn crop prospects deteriorated, producers have been contacting their crop insurance agents, examining their insurance policies and wondering how they might be compensated. [more]
Soybean producers should scout their crop for seed fill and drought stress as the time frame for decent yields is narrowing, said Chad Lee, grain crops specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture. [more]
This summer’s drought has not only been tough on agricultural producers, but it has taken a toll on many homeowner’s lawns. While timely rains in July helped grasses in central and eastern areas of the state rebound, a lack of rain in Western Kentucky is keeping lawns parched.
While drought conditions have improved in Central and Eastern Kentucky, farmers are still feeling its effects and will be for some time. With drought-damaged corn and lower feed supplies, producers are preparing for winter and hoping for better weather next season. [more]
As with many of the state’s crops, Kentucky cool-season forages have taken a hit from the drought and high temperatures. According to the Kentucky Weekly Crop and Weather Report released Aug.13, more than half of the state’s pastures were considered in poor or very poor condition. [more]
Remnants of Hurricane Isaac provided much needed moisture for most of the state’s soybean crop, said Chad Lee, grain crops specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture. [more]
Forage producers reseeding their drought-damaged pastures this fall will want to be on the lookout for fall armyworm as the new grass seedlings emerge, said Lee Townsend, extension entomologist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture. [more]